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The interesting story of Derinkuyu

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
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Board Moderator
#1
WOW. Getting into the Ancient Civilizations board has really opened up a smorgasbord of data - leading to new or intriguing trails for inquiry.

With the discovery of Gobekli Tepe, and other Tepe's in that near neighbourhood, a special place now in south-eastern Turkey, once called Anatolia, has been attracting a lot of attention. Within that, there is a very special place once called Cappadocia, where there is a subterranean city carved out and which was used over the last 2,000 - 3,000 years right up until approximately 1923 for people to leave the surface and survive periods of war or climactic or geological upheaval. This subterranean city is called Derinkuyu.

A simply told and pictorial slideshow presentation on the subject of Derinkuyu is available at:

http://www.icepop.com/renovation-ancient-secret/

At another site, here is an informative comment from the Comments section about this place:

http://www.cappadociaturkey.net/derinkuyu_underground_city.htm

somethgblue December 27, 2015 at 2:25 pm
Recent research by Turkish Historian Omer Demir, author of Cappadocia: Cradle of Civilization, has developed the idea that this huge underground city complex was designed and built at the end of the Palaeolithic era, right before the anti-diluvian flood mentioned in the Bible, 12,500 years ago and that the Phrygians merely discovered and expanded on this already megalithic structure. Due to the problematic ability of archeologists to date solid volcanic rock, no definitive era can be determined for its construction.

Its location near Mt. Arafat where Noah’s Ark came to rest after the flood, the nearness to the megalithic structure of Gobekli Tepi and the fact that each floor could be sealed off from the one above it by half ton, water tight doorways of solid rock suggest that it was designed and built by architects on a grand scale to withstand flooding.

The fact that Derinkuyu is only one small city (yet could still hold as many as 25 to 50 thousand people) in a complex of over 200 cities, linked by miles of tunnels and the recently discovered (2014) ‘unknown to history’ city below the modern city of Nevsechir an hour drive North of Derinkuyu that dwarfs Derinkuyu by tenfold, suggests that this vast complex has yet to be thoroughly explored or understood.

I suggest that this city complex was designed and built around the time of Noah’s Ark and the ‘Sinking of Atlantis’ for humanity to survive the coming deluge that was obviously a well known fact. Noah would not have been able to design and build an Ark (submarine) of the dimensions written about in the Bible without advanced knowledge and highly technical assistance. So it is not a stretch to imagine that a city complex on the scale of the U.S. Deep Underground Military Bases (D.U.M.B.s) could be built as well.

The advanced technology and knowledge needed to build an underground city of such complexity would require architects and stone masons, capable of building such megalithic structures as the Giza Pyramids and Gobekli Tepi, while moving tons of rock. The thousands of tons of rock that would need to be moved to create this city complex has never been found, perhaps the flood swept it away.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#2
These book references supporting the Wikipedia entry show that this bi-racial era came to an end when the triumphant Kemal Ataturk did a spot of ethnic cleansing, moving entire populations of Greeks/Greek descendants out of the area back to Greece, in approximately 1923. That is the time that people stopped using the labyrinth for living purposes. Only since 1965 has it been partially opened up for tourists to view it (under newly installed electric light, of course).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derinkuyu_underground_city

Horrocks, Geoffrey C. (2010). Greek: A History of the Language and Its Speakers. John Wiley & Sons. p. 403. ISBN 978-1-4051-3415-6. None the less, at the beginning of the 20th century, Greek still had a strong presence in Silli north-west of Konya (ancient Ikonion), in Pharasa and other villages in the region drained by the Yenice river (some 100km south of Kayeri, ancient Caesarea), and in Cappadocia proper, at Arabison (Arapsu/Gulsehir) north-west of Nevsehir (ancient Nyssa), and in the large region south of Nevsehir as far down as Nigde and Bor (close to ancient Tyana)..... Away from the valleys, some of the villages have vast underground complexes containing houses, cellars, stables, refectories, cemeteries and churches, affording protection from marauding Arabs in the days when the Byzantine empire extended to the Euphrates, and serving later as places of refuge from hostile Turkish raiders. The most famous of these are at Kaymakli and Derinkuyu, formerly the Greek villages of Anaku (Inegi) and Malakopi (Melagob), where the chambers extended down over several levels of depths of up to 85 metres.

Rodley, Lyn (2010). Cave Monasteries of Byzantine Cappadocia. Cambridge University Press. p. 1. ISBN 978-0-521-15477-2.
....At this time the region was still inhabited by a mixed population of Turkish-speaking Moslems and Greek-speaking Christians. The latter group left for Greece in the early 1920s, during an exchange of population of minorities that was part of the radical social re-ordering initiated by Kemal Ataturk; they were replaced by Turks from Greece, mostly from Thrace.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
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Board Moderator
#3
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#4
Apparently, when the residents needed to hide from aggressors flowing over their territory (including marauding hordes from the Far East in the Middle Ages) they were able to move all their livestock into the caves and tunnels as well as their extended families - leaving the surface looking as if it had been suddenly depopulated at a recent past event. The deep water wells and airshafts as well as security built into the construction of the complexes meant they could remain beneath the surface for many months at a time.

nevs3.jpg

https://cappadociadreams.com/nevsehir-center/

Here is a small potted history of the Nevsehir site (Nevsehir translates as New City):

Massive 5,000-year-old underground city uncovered in Cappadocia




A new underground city in Turkey’s historic region of Cappadocia was accidentally discovered in the central province of Nevşehir.

The country’s state-run housing authority, TOKI, halted an urban development project after a large underground city dating back 5,000 years was found during the excavations.....

Officials said a seven-kilometer tunnel with connections to underground living spaces was found in the area, which was placed under preservation after the discovery.....

Nevşehir Mayor Hasan Ünver said the underground city was the “largest” in the world and covered an area of about 400,000 square meters. “It has a seven-kilometer road dotted with churches, galleries and other structures. It is estimated that the city dates back to the era of the Hittites, similar to other underground cities in Nevşehir. We are now working to make it open for visitors. We will build walking platforms inside and a large park will be built on the surface,” he said.



Nevşehir, located at the heart of Cappadocia, which now covers several central cities, is home to countless subterranean settlements of different sizes..... Although they date back to the pre-Christianity era, they were mostly inhabited in the Byzantine period when frequent invasions by foreign forces forced locals to hide in underground cities with an intricate tunnel system. The cities, including the newly discovered one in central Nevşehir, host several facilities including churches, wine cellars and food storage, livestock stalls as well as schools.
 

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
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#5
There doesn't seem like many people interested in ancient civilizations on the forum at the moment! ;-)
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#6
Laron, I got a bit down-hearted myself when I went to research a submerged find off the western coast of India (publicised 2002-3), only to find out there is a lot of controversy about it, and that the archaeological PTB aren't having any of anything which questions the perceived and popularised "truth" of history. The alternative history reporters (Graham Hancock, Andrew Collins, et al) have their work cut out for them to consistently provide well written and well researched data, to surmount the negative cast put about by the archaeology establishment. In this Indian case, although there clearly appears to be evidence of a submerged ruin in a place where rising water levels ingressed, creating a bay or inlet, they are saying that the way the initial finder of the site conducted their work (dredging) contaminated any evidence found.

I think the disconnect between alternative history-savvy people and people digging their heels in to protect their reputations could be the biggest story around within the field, right now.
 

Linda

Sweetheart of the Rodeo
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#8
Holy moly - what a find - it is staggering to think of the planning and construction of such a place. I'd like to see that place.
 

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