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A Walipini Greenhouse

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
Staff member
Administrator
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Creator of transients.info & The Roundtable
#1
A Walipini is a greenhouse built into the ground to take advantage of the stable temperatures and thermal mass of the earth and enable you to grow all year long, in almost any climate.

lk.jpg
Those those living at a high elevation wondering about trying this, elevation may affect the type and amount of sunlight that plants receive, the amount of water that plants can absorb and the nutrients that are available in the soil. As a result, certain plants grow very well in high elevations, whereas others can only grow in middle or lower elevations.

Here's an article talking about growing a garden above 5,000 feet: https://www.planetnatural.com/high-altitude-gardening/.
 
OP
OP
Laron

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
Staff member
Administrator
Board Moderator
Creator of transients.info & The Roundtable
#2
I'd like to do a hugelkultur inside one of these.

HugelkulturRaisedBed.jpg
 
OP
OP
Laron

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
Staff member
Administrator
Board Moderator
Creator of transients.info & The Roundtable
#4
I’ve seen this done on an Alaskan reality tv show. Now that’s clever!
I've seen an underground freezer made on an Alaskan reality documentary show!
 

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#5
Hugelkultur is the very slow release of the carbon and other mineral atoms in the mound of wood, hay and dirt. Fire would be the quick release method. Charcoal and ashes are often used on gardens, but I don't think they have a reach of 20 years! I think attention should be paid to the type of wood, though. It would have to be natural (not coated in anything man-made like creosotes); and I think the quicker growing pinewoods, etc, may not be the best for the nutritive value, as they are often grown in soils that have already been "bleached" of soil minerals by these greedy growers.
 

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