Reflexology Art & What is Reflexology (1 Viewer)

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Laron

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I came across the above picture the other day which visually portrays the purpose behind reflexology. But what is reflexology?

Brent A. Bauer, M.D., explains it:

"Reflexology is the application of pressure to areas on the feet (or the hands). Reflexology is generally relaxing and may help alleviate stress.​
The theory behind reflexology is that areas of the foot correspond to organs and systems of the body. Pressure applied to the foot is believed to bring relaxation and healing to the corresponding area of the body.​
Reflexologists use foot charts to guide them as they apply pressure to specific areas. Reflexology is sometimes combined with other hands-on therapies and may be offered by chiropractors and physical therapists, among others.​
Several studies indicate that reflexology may reduce pain and psychological symptoms, such as stress and anxiety, and enhance relaxation and sleep. Given that reflexology is also low risk, it can be a reasonable option if you're seeking relaxation and stress relief." (Source)​

I find it interesting how wikipedia defines certain things. This is what it says about reflexology. "Reflexology, also known as zone therapy, is an alternative medicine involving application of pressure to the feet and hands with specific thumb, finger, and hand techniques without the use of oil or lotion. It is based on a pseudoscientific system of zones and reflex areas that purportedly reflect an image of the body on the feet and hands, with the premise that such work effects a physical change to the body. There is no convincing evidence that reflexology is effective for any medical condition"

It's funny that they say there is no convincing evidence, yet there are people practicing reflexology, having spent a lot of time on their education around it, are have practices setup around the world helping people — obviously it works, and obviously it can help with certain medical conditions. (I'm still annoyed at Wikipedia for not allowing Dolores Cannon to have an entry, simply because she self published her books)

Anyway, is anyone out there a reflexologist? Have any of you got some experiences to share from having a session with one?
 
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Sinera

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It's funny that they say there is no convincing evidence, yet there are people practicing reflexology, having spent a lot of time on their education around it, are have practices setup around the world helping people — obviously it works, and obviously it can help with certain medical conditions. (I'm still annoyed at Wikipedia for not allowing Dolores Cannon to have an entry, simply because she self published her books)?
I agree. Wikipedia is a joke, it is written by die-hard 'skeptics' adhering to scientism and materialism, maybe even some pharma shills in the field of medicine. They've occupied it from the start and won the editing wars. You cannot go against them there.

Actually, you could make this complaint about ANY alternative/naturopathic therapy, even those therapies that are not really alternative/naturopathic but yet not pharma-based and mainstream get criticized in a very one-sided way and labelled 'pseudo-scientific'.

Wikipedia is far more pseudo-scientific. There are already so many websites, blogs, even books and even movies debunking Wikipedia and tearing it apart. It's a joke.

Anyway, is anyone out there a reflexologist? Have any of you got some experiences to share from having a session with one?
A few years ago I started to learn the theory as I considered adding it to my list of therapies. I still have some pdfs about it. I dropped it though. Can't start too much, needed focus.
 

Hailstones Melt

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In 1982 I started having a weekly reflexology session in NZ, and continued this for 2 years. Later on, I had weekly sessions for at least 6-7 years. Only this year, 2018, I have been unable to afford this luxury. But the other day, I popped in to see my Chinese masseuse who does it, to wish her a Merry Christmas, and she gave me a free half-hour reflexology session as a gift! Even without the reflexology sessions this year, my podiatrist yesterday told me my circulation is still good in both feet, and nerve ending damage is not too bad (due to diabetes). I hold that this is because I have paid so much attention to my feet over the years, and continue to apply moisturisers and also rub my feet as best I can.

In Tasmania in 1990 I picked up a piece of driftwood from Lake St Clair which was perfect fitting into my hand, and shaped down to a point to apply pressure onto reflexology points in the feet or hands. I still have this. I'll post a picture later today.

I have avidly read "Stories the Feet Have Told" and other reflexology manuals. I just enjoy reading what a lot of good the technique can do.

Wikipedia is nuts if the contributor who wrote that discounts it out of hand. They obviously have no knowledge of meridians, or how nerves transmit bioelectricity/chi around the body, and how the flow of chi energises the entire body. Especially to the feet, which can suffer from poor circulation. I should add that having had so much reflexology in my life, my feet became hyper-sensitized, and I could feel tings and chi pulses in them at any time day or night. Obviously, working the ends of the meridians in your feet (or hands) allows a proper flow as the meridians pass through the organs of your body. So the benefit is felt in locations remote to the feet. A good chi massage on the feet also helps Earth-grounding if you stand on dirt or grass afterwards and ground your energy down.

Reflexology falls into the Energy Medicine systems, and as such, is at the forefront of healing for those that understand what the human body really is.
 
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One65

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Several years ago I was having severe pain in my feet when I got out of bed. Could hardly get to the shower. I went to see a doctor about it. He told me to stop jogging. Later he told me I had gout. Then he told me that the problem was that I needed to do MORE jogging. Then I was sent for shock therapy in my feet (anyone out there enjoy mild electrocution? I didn't). Then I was sent to a series of alternating hot and cold water dips. You get the idea... he was guessing. This went on for over 3 months. Then I went to a reflexologist. In 5 minutes he told me that my feet were full of (something like) mucus, and that I was reacting to the calcium in dairy food. He tested me - gave me a different kind of calcium - and I was literally improving that very day. Problem was gone in 4 days.
 

Lila

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All I know is that the few times I've gotten reflexology done (or even just a foot massage) the relaxation I felt couldn't be beat.
There is something about finding and soothing the right spot in our hardworking tootsies that just can't be beat.
 
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Hailstones Melt

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Several years ago I was having severe pain in my feet when I got out of bed. Could hardly get to the shower. I went to see a doctor about it. He told me to stop jogging. Later he told me I had gout. Then he told me that the problem was that I needed to do MORE jogging. Then I was sent for shock therapy in my feet (anyone out there enjoy mild electrocution? I didn't). Then I was sent to a series of alternating hot and cold water dips. You get the idea... he was guessing. This went on for over 3 months. Then I went to a reflexologist. In 5 minutes he told me that my feet were full of (something like) mucus, and that I was reacting to the calcium in dairy food. He tested me - gave me a different kind of calcium - and I was literally improving that very day. Problem was gone in 4 days.
You would know if you had gout. I had it only once (an accumulation of undissolved uric acid in the toes) and it was agonizing to walk even a few feet. I luckily perchance (yeah, not really perchance) happened on an alternative healer who did a reiki-type healing, or maybe re-balancing, and dissolved the grains in my toes, and off I went happy as Larry, never to have it occur again.
 
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Hailstones Melt

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You would know if you had gout. I had it only once (an accumulation of undissolved uric acid in the toes) and it was agonizing to walk even a few feet. I luckily perchance (yeah, not really perchance) happened on an alternative healer who did a reiki-type healing, or maybe re-balancing, and dissolved the grains in my toes, and off I went happy as Larry, never to have it occur again.
I have just remembered the name of the therapy that cured me of this - Bowen Therapy. Might be interesting for some people to look into.
 
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Alain

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I came across the above picture the other day which visually portrays the purpose behind reflexology. But what is reflexology?

Brent A. Bauer, M.D., explains it:

"Reflexology is the application of pressure to areas on the feet (or the hands). Reflexology is generally relaxing and may help alleviate stress.​
The theory behind reflexology is that areas of the foot correspond to organs and systems of the body. Pressure applied to the foot is believed to bring relaxation and healing to the corresponding area of the body.​
Reflexologists use foot charts to guide them as they apply pressure to specific areas. Reflexology is sometimes combined with other hands-on therapies and may be offered by chiropractors and physical therapists, among others.​
Several studies indicate that reflexology may reduce pain and psychological symptoms, such as stress and anxiety, and enhance relaxation and sleep. Given that reflexology is also low risk, it can be a reasonable option if you're seeking relaxation and stress relief." (Source)​

I find it interesting how wikipedia defines certain things. This is what it says about reflexology. "Reflexology, also known as zone therapy, is an alternative medicine involving application of pressure to the feet and hands with specific thumb, finger, and hand techniques without the use of oil or lotion. It is based on a pseudoscientific system of zones and reflex areas that purportedly reflect an image of the body on the feet and hands, with the premise that such work effects a physical change to the body. There is no convincing evidence that reflexology is effective for any medical condition"

It's funny that they say there is no convincing evidence, yet there are people practicing reflexology, having spent a lot of time on their education around it, are have practices setup around the world helping people — obviously it works, and obviously it can help with certain medical conditions. (I'm still annoyed at Wikipedia for not allowing Dolores Cannon to have an entry, simply because she self published her books)

Anyway, is anyone out there a reflexologist? Have any of you got some experiences to share from having a session with one?

the thing i know about wikipedia is everyone can post in there what he/she wants and so much nonsense can be found, now if this is really true i don t know but due to how things are and written there it seems more like a controlled plattform
 

Alain

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Several years ago I was having severe pain in my feet when I got out of bed. Could hardly get to the shower. I went to see a doctor about it. He told me to stop jogging. Later he told me I had gout. Then he told me that the problem was that I needed to do MORE jogging. Then I was sent for shock therapy in my feet (anyone out there enjoy mild electrocution? I didn't). Then I was sent to a series of alternating hot and cold water dips. You get the idea... he was guessing. This went on for over 3 months. Then I went to a reflexologist. In 5 minutes he told me that my feet were full of (something like) mucus, and that I was reacting to the calcium in dairy food. He tested me - gave me a different kind of calcium - and I was literally improving that very day. Problem was gone in 4 days.
in reading this the problems with my back came back to memory the kine used masaging oil and a machine that used an electornic massage or somthing like that, i has more aches after than before at the beginning, luckilly it is gone due to my personal attention on how i work
 
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Toller

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My nephew had reflexology for a short while many years ago now, I know that it helped him at the time. His life hasn't been much fun since his mid teens, he has been labelled as autistic, schizophrenic, etc. the medics just can't seem to find a label for his condition.

I agree. Wikipedia is a joke, it is written by die-hard 'skeptics' adhering to scientism and materialism, maybe even some pharma shills in the field of medicine. They've occupied it from the start and won the editing wars. You cannot go against them there.

Actually, you could make this complaint about ANY alternative/naturopathic therapy, even those therapies that are not really alternative/naturopathic but yet not pharma-based and mainstream get criticized in a very one-sided way and labelled 'pseudo-scientific'.

Wikipedia is far more pseudo-scientific. There are already so many websites, blogs, even books and even movies debunking Wikipedia and tearing it apart. It's a joke.
As Sinera said, Wikipedia is a joke when it comes to alternative medical practices, it is totally under the control of sceptics. I can remember certain pages which were originally quite good in the past, until the sceptics got hold of them and they were totally rewritten. Here are a couple from memory which I remember being totally changed :-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radionics

I know that homeopathy can work in the right circumstance, and with a certified practioner, radionic healing will always work, provided the practioner has permission from the higher self.
 

therium

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I agree. Wikipedia is a joke, it is written by die-hard 'skeptics' adhering to scientism and materialism,
You can make your own wiki about anything and it's free at Miraheze.org. The only catch is you have to make an edit every 60 days or the wiki will go into "hibernate" mode. After another 30-60 days (they are pretty lax on this part) the wiki gets deleted or put up for adoption.

Maybe we need a wiki on this stuff? I'm up for starting it and adding users who can edit it if you like, I've used their site before. User accounts are free. I think the site is based in France but response time for it is great for me in the US.

Should we start a thread about creating a metaphysical wiki? Maybe there's one out there already we can contribute to. Bibliotecapleyades.net is not a wiki, but it is a huge collection of data and stories.

EDIT: Ok, thread opened here about making a new wiki.
 
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