Printing LEDs on flexible plastic. (1 Viewer)

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therium

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Researchers in the University of Toronto's Department of Materials Science & Engineering have developed the world's most efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on plastic. This result enables a flexible form factor, not to mention a less costly, alternative to traditional OLED manufacturing, which currently relies on rigid glass.

The results are reported online in the latest issue of Nature Photonics.

OLEDs provide high-contrast and low-energy displays that are rapidly becoming the dominant technology for advanced electronic screens. They are already used in some cell phone and other smaller-scale applications.

Current state-of-the-art OLEDs are produced using heavy-metal doped glass in order to achieve high efficiency and brightness, which makes them expensive to manufacture, heavy, rigid and fragile.

"For years, the biggest excitement behind OLED technologies has been the potential to effectively produce them on flexible plastic," says Materials Science & Engineering Professor Zheng-Hong Lu, the Canada Research Chair (Tier I) in Organic Optoelectronics.


Z. B. Wang, M. G. Helander, J. Qiu, D. P. Puzzo, M. T. Greiner, Z. M. Hudson, S. Wang, Z. W. Liu, Z. H. Lu. Unlocking the full potential of organic light-emitting diodes on flexible plastic. Nature Photonics, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/nphoton.2011.259. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2011.259

Article from https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111031121229.htm

I like how Science Daily gives us several ready-made citation formats to use, with the URL. :D
 
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