Passchendaele trenches (1 Viewer)

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Hailstones Melt

Collected Consciousness
Staff member
Board Moderator
Aug 15, 2016
3,689
11,146
Perth, Western Australia
This image of the trenches in Passchendaele in late 1917 flicked past me in a second in a film I was watching on TV. But the image burned into my retina. So I looked it up online, and found it as a still photo.

First, here is the ordinary size:

image in explosive smoke.png

and here is an enlarged view:

image in explosive smoke.png

Can you see the walking man in the smoke of the explosion in the top right hand corner? And can you see the dog or fox faces looking directly out of that conflagration? Can you see that the walking man in the smoke is wearing a trench helmet, the same as the soldiers in the foreground? I also see an aura around the being in this image. I don't think the living people in the scene could have perceived these, but the photo makes it really stand out. As I say, I got the strong impression when the image flashed in front of me for just one second on television. Perhaps the light of the plasma TV made the image more illumined?
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Collected Consciousness
Staff member
Board Moderator
Aug 15, 2016
3,689
11,146
Perth, Western Australia
The scientific name for seeing faces in inanimate objects or even in smoke or clouds is pareidolia. I've brought up the topic on this forum before. The reason is I see them very easily, but especially in smoke or clouds. I don't like it when science needs to label everything as a conspiracy (such as neurotic, negative people see pareidolia). I want to say I think it is a spiritually refined ability, because there are other realities morphed and woven in with the one we are experiencing.

But here is one view from science on the subject:

Who is most likely to experience pareidolia?
It is often hypothesised that people who are more religious, or believe in the supernatural, are more prone to pareidolia.
Studies show that neurotic people, and people in negative moods, are more likely to experience pareidolia. The reason for this seems to be that these people are on higher alert for danger, so are more likely to spot something that isn’t there.
Women seem to be more prone to seeing faces where there are none. This may be linked to the fact that they have a better ability to recognise emotions through deciphering facial expressions.
Whoever you are, whatever you’re doing, you can experience pareidolia. Don’t let it shock you, it’s just your ancient survival instincts kicking in.

https://www.lenstore.co.uk/eyecare/pareidolia-science
 

Alain

Roaming Contributor
Aug 29, 2017
1,507
3,252
change the alert for danger in awe for beauty and it fits better
 

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