Lyme Disease Cure (1 Viewer)

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Vickie

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My husband is diabetic so he uses sugar alternatives but so much information has come out about how bad they are for the body and brain. When stevia came out in stores I was excited to buy it since it's all natural. In recent years much information has come out about the benefits of stevia for the brain and to maintain glucose levels for diabetics. It's very good for the body.

Now researchers have discovered that stevia kills the pathogens of Lyme disease. Antibiotics have always been used for Lyme disease but they are not very effective unless they are taken very early. Most people that have contracted Lyme disease don't know they have it until it's too late to treat. Once it becomes chronic it can mean a lifetime of health problems.

This is a big discovery since more than 300,000 people are newly diagnosed with Lyme disease per year. I have a neighbor that can no longer walk or talk. He contracted Lyme disease about six years ago and his health continues to decline.

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2017/01/25/study-finds-stevia-kills-lyme-disease-pathogen-better-than-antibiotics/
 
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Vickie

Vickie

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I grow stevia every year, and it is now fairly common in garden centers.
I took it indoors this year, but also dry it and use it as an herb.

Very intriguing about its use with Lyme Disease.
Thanks for catching that, Vickie.
I'll look for it this spring and fill my garden with it. I didn't know you could so easily buy it to grow. Thanks!
 

Linda

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Thanks - good info.

Kris Kristofferson was misdiagnosed with Alzheimers and dementia, but it turned out he had Lyme disease. His wife said after a few weeks off all the olds meds and on the proper treatment, it was like the old Kris was back.
 
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Vickie

Vickie

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Thanks - good info.

Kris Kristofferson was misdiagnosed with Alzheimers and dementia, but it turned out he had Lyme disease. His wife said after a few weeks off all the olds meds and on the proper treatment, it was like the old Kris was back.
It is bad. I didn't know Kris Kristofferson had lymes. I'm glad they got him on the right meds. For many people antibiotics don't work but I have heard of some other alternative treatments but doctors will only prescribe antibiotics.

We have so much wildlife and of course the wildlife have lots of ticks so my dogs bring them in the house.
 
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Angela

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Vickie

Vickie

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I read through the CDC study that Anaeika posted and the study does show that Stevia extract works to kill the Lyme disease pathogens. It does say that antibiotics will help most people but if the Lyme has become chronic then antibiotics do not work. 20% of people have chronic Lyme disease according to the CDC. I would bet that figure is much higher.

The CDC study said that the powdered form of stevia (like you buy in stores as a sweetener) is not very effective but an alcohol extract from fresh leaves worked best.

I'm sure going to grow it and make a stevia tincture to use to keep on hand. We have so many deer ticks here and have been bitten many times.
 

Linda

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Need to bump this thread up because I got a bite from a Lone Star tick - the kind that carries all the awful things like Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

Good news - I found it fast before it took much of a hold. I just happened to have an appointment with my person who said I needed to start the high dose vitamin c regimen (ascorbic acid - 3 grams for every 20 lbs of body weight). I've got a powder and am dissolving in water for a quick drink every 2 hours while awake. The vitamin c will kill off all the unfriendlies that may have hitched a ride.

I figured I'm having this experience because I have a better chance of dealing with it and can alert others who might come in contact with those critters.
 

Anaeika

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How did you get one on you, Linda? Haven’t seen any since I moved to Texas. But I do see lots of fleas here. Arizona had a lot of ticks. The family dog we had used to get them a lot and I just remember my mom pulling them off with tweezers.
 

Linda

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There are plenty in Texas. If you go into a wooded area, they will find you.
Prevention is rule 1.
 

Lila

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The herbal webinar that someone posted here a few months ago had a section on Lyme. I took notes.

They were very big on Japanese knotweed as a key herbal for Lyme's. Also mentioned were astragalus, uni d'agator (cat's claw), artemesia, elderflower, androgrphis and eluthro. They talked about the tough chronic cases were using all of these in rotation was most helpful, along with a raw probiotic.
 
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Linda

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The herbal webinar that someone posted here a few months ago had a section on Lyme. I took notes.
That was me - thanks for the reminder.

For anyone reading now or later - there are two main points here

FIRST - if you get a tick bite, particularly a Lone Star tick, do something immediately to kill off whatever virus / bacteria / etc. it brought to your body. I'm going with the mega C treatment, but other treatments may work, such as colloidal silver or antibiotics. You need to talk with your own health care person. DO THIS IMMEDIATELY because there is a small window of time to be able to stop the nasty things before they imbed in your muscles, organs, etc.

Second - should you end up with Lyme's disease, this thread has a lot of good info.

Lastly, perhaps some of the people here have some ideas about insect - particularly tick - repellants. Not going through this at all would be a better path.
 
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Lila

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Brilliant summary, Linda. Thanks for putting it in perspective.

I'd also add that the CDC article below talks about antibiotics that your doctor would prescribe as being most likely to work in that first 3 -30 days after a tick bite and to see a doctor if you get any symptoms of Lyme which include "fever, rash, facial paralysis, and arthritis" especially if you live in/travel to any area that has Lyme (which, when I look at their map looks like pretty much the entire continental US).
The 'symptoms of late Lyme' list is longer and this is where people especially seem to blog about getting better results from herbals.

 
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Lila

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I think we had a post someplace about prevention of bites and believe I recall citronella and lemongrass oils being on the list.
 
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Linda

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Update - just 4 more doses remaining. It feels like an army marching through each cell of my body on a search and eliminate mission. Discovered a tiny bit of salt dissolved in water with the ascorbic acid softens the bite.

Also, I am using a colloidal silver gel on the actual bite. It did help tone down the itching, and the bite is healing fairly well.
 
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Linda

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Searched for a thread on insect repellants and did not find it.

Angela and Anaeika are far more knowledgeable than I am on the use of natural oils.

The CDC and other official type sources recommend repellants with DEET. However, that is a registered insecticide, so I'm thinking NOOOO for me.

I've seen some recommendations for Rose Geranium and Sweetgrass essential oils. There are some oil combinations that can be used on dogs, but not for cats.

Chickens are the best elimination tools for ticks (and chiggers, too). In lieu of that, planting herbs that repellants ticks in your yard also is a good step. Of course, if you have pets and young children, you need to check to see if they are safe for them.

Basically, the idea is to mask our human scent so the ticks cannot find us!
 
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Anaeika

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Thank you for your update, Linda.

This is what I found to do for a tick bite. After getting the tick out, apply 1 drop lavender every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. It does say to seek a professional if the bite causes a rash.

This is also what I found to repel insects. I am not finding anything specific to ticks.5C9FC555-582E-4233-91E1-D3BB52122215.png7FD6BE85-50BD-4718-90E3-71DF102E9BE4.png
 
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Linda

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After getting the tick out, apply 1 drop lavender every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. It does say to seek a professional if the bite causes a rash.
Best to see your health care person asap because rashes or circles around the bite, which may be indicators of Lyme, etc. do not always appear. Also, for treatment to be most effective, it needs to start as soon as possible. I feel as though this info is part of my mission.

Don't dawdle because there are no clear cut indicators of Lyme, etc. immediately after a tick bite.
 
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bo atkinson

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I never got a diagnosed condition, but the following might explain why... For those who like to hear reports of confidence in natures way… We get many ticks here in Maine, after snow melts, including the bad kind. No illnesses resulted for us over years of these tick invasions, (actually invading here less than a decade by now and counting, before that, tick attacks were rare in the garden). Some even half burrowed into our skin before detection and we always managed to fully extract them ourselves, without buying services from doctors. Doctors nowadays want to prescribe unneeded drugs, IMO and simply lack an education in many of nature’s secrets. Bumps can take a while to disappear, that is the body’s natural response to restrict the spread of bite-poisons, until poisons can be gradually expelled. Just keep up good health practices to get well. I prefer the green-powdered stevia, in fruit+seed smoothies. Stevia pulverised straight from the leaves, rather than any form of extracts or refined types of stevia, this is my preference. ... Once it even developed an interesting taste, in a several year old bag. (?) Some commercial stevia products add artificial sweetening chemicals which I strictly avoid. I have read warnings about that too. Check labels to be sure.
 

Linda

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Overall good health certainly is helpful. I do believe food is medicine and can be augmented with supplements and tinctures when necessary. Even though I'm moving on in years, I've managed to stay reasonably healthy - without getting caught up in the western medicine model. It is good to have another perspective of healthy living and no issues with ticks.

In my case, the ticks I've come across have been dog ticks, which may be troublesome in the short term, but don't require much more than some topical treatment. However, this time it was a Lone Star tick. (FYI - important to know your ticks.) I just happened to see my person who is well-versed in traditional and fundamental medicine. Her advice was not to ignore this bite and go with something that will not hurt my body but will address any riders the tick may have brought. The cost of the powdered ascorbic acid was $20.

Since people of different ages, with different levels of health, as well as people responsible for children may be reading this thread and I'm not health care person, I am cautious about saying everything will be fine. My person, who does have a medical background told me not to screw around with this one, so I did not and have passed along the info from "my journey".
 

Laron

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I see a lot of helpful information shared on this thread! Thanks for letting us know about your tick bite experience Linda!

I never got a diagnosed condition, but the following might explain why...
And thanks for adding that bo!
 

therium

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Catnip keeps bugs away? I didn't know that. I have all these cats coming in the backyard laying around leaving Dorito wrappers on the ground. I should move some catnip to where my strawberries are. I think earwigs are eating the berries.
 

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