Lobsang Rampa books from my library shelf (1 Viewer)

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Hailstones Melt

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There may be some interest in the old Lobsang Rampa books (Tuesday Lobsang Rampa). Some of us read these as children or young adults, and then they went out of print, and we moved on and some of our books moved on to other places. I was first introduced as a young teen, as my parents had an eclectic bookshelf. My sister also enjoyed reading these books and some of her enthusiasm rubbed off on me.

In approximately 2017 I went onto Amazon to see what books were still available, and this is the collection I was able to purchase. Below are the covers, and the publication details for each book. Please note, some of these productions are cheap re-prints of the original versions, but to me the important fact was that the books were available for reading once again. Some of them are compilations of multiple works (some Lobsang Rampa works are quite short, and wouldn't fill a large publication).

Here is a sequential list of the original Rampa books (in date of publication):

The Third Eye, 1956 - The autobiography of a young Tibetan noble Tuesday Lobsang Rampa.
Doctor from Lhasa - 1958 - continuation of the autobiography from 1927.
The Rampa Story - 1960 - completing the autobiographical trilogy.
Cave of the Ancients - 1963 - A story of Lobsang's experiences in the Chakpori lamasery.
Living with the Lama - 1964 - autobiography of the Rampa's Siamese cat, Mrs Fifi Greywhiskers (Lobsang Rampa says he received this telepathically from the cat).
You Forever - 1965 - a book of instruction for those trying to develop psychic powers.
Wisdom of the Ancients - 1965 - A dictionary of esoteric terms
The Saffron Robe - 1966 - Details some of Lobsang's experiences in lamaseries in Lhasa, including meeting the Dalai Lama (the one who wears the saffron robe)
Chapters of Life - 1967 - A book of metaphysics, explaining such concepts as other dimensions, parallel worlds, prophecy and the coming of the world leader.
Beyond the Tenth - 1969 - Question and answer book
Feeding the Flame - 1971 - Answers questions submitted by readers
The Hermit - 1972 - the story of a blind old Tibetan hermit who was abducted by extraterrestrials, who called themselves the Gardeners of the Earth (and gives an account of our ancient origins)
The Thirteenth Candle - 1973 - more stories about Tibet, and information on controversial subjects
Candlelight - 1974 - discussions of such topics as pendulums and religion
Twilight - 1975 - Hollow Earth concept discussed in detail
As It Was - 1976 - condensed version of the author's life, including expanding upon events originally outlined in the trilogy
I Believe - 1977 - The death and after death experiences of a suicide, the book answers many questions about the afterlife
Three Lives - 1978 - Theme of Life after Death in more detail.
Tibetan Sage - 1980 - Rampa's final book in which he returns to his boyhood in Lhasa and describes a hidden cave near Lhasa which contained an alien control centre preserved by suspended animation

Unauthorised or unauthenticated Rampa works:
My Visit to Venus - an anthology of early Rampa writings including a visit to Venus in a spaceship, another look at the subsurface Earth world, and about Ultima Thule

My Visit to Agharta - 2003 - an anthology of (allegedly) newly discovered writings on the inner world of Agharta. The content of these is considered by Karen Mutton to be highly questionable.

Then there are books by Sarah Rampa (his wife in the second half of Rampa's life, after the walk-in), and a book by Sheelagh Rouse, who was his secretary for many years. The famous Siamese cats who lived with the Rampas at the time these books were written are: Miss Ku'ei; Mrs Fifi Greywhiskers; Tadalinka; Cleopatra; Sindi; and Tigerlily who belonged to the Hoskins.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

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To those who know nothing of Lobsang Rampa, here is a Foreword written by him from his Tibetan Sage book, and it gives some insight to his special brand of cheekiness, and also perhaps, frustration at being someone who is living ahead of their times:

"People hooted and jeered when, some few years ago, I wrote in The Third Eye that I had flown in kites. One would have thought that I had committed a great crime in saying that. But now - well, we look about and we can see people flying in kites. Some of them are high above the water being towed by a speed boat. Yet others are kites with a man aboard, he stands on the edge of a cliff or high piece of ground, and then he jumps off and he is actually flying in a kite. Nobody says now that Lobsang Rampa was right, but they certainly did hoot when I wrote about kite flying.

There have been quite a number of things which were "science fiction" a few years ago, but now - well, now they are almost every day occurrences. We can have a satellite in space, and in London, we can pick up the television programs from the USA or from Japan. I predicted that. We also now have had a man, or rather men, walking on the Moon. All my books are true, and they are gradually being proved true. This book is not a novel. It is not science fiction. it is the absolutely unvarnished truth of what happened to me, and I again state that there is no author's license in the book. I say this book is true, but you may want to believe it to be science fiction or something like that.

Well, fine, you are quite at liberty to have a good laugh and call it science fiction, and perhaps before you have actually finished reading the book some event will occur which will prove my books true. But I will have you know that I will not answer any questions about this book. I have had such an enormous mail about the other books, and people do not even put in return postage and, with postal rates as they are at present, sometimes it takes more to reply to a reader's letter than he paid for the book in the first case.

Well, here is the book. I hope you like it. I hope you find it believable. If you do not find it believable, it may be that you have not yet reached the necessary stage of evolution."
 
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June

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Thanks for the reminder of Lobsang, Melt, I have some of his books and wouldn’t mind getting some more, that’s quite an impressive list on Amazon.
 

Sinera

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Have you read all of them already? And what is 'the best' (if there is one) in your opinion? The Alien stuff seems fascinating to me.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

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Certainly the trilogy about his life (The Third Eye, The Doctor From Lhasa and The Rampa Story) is fascinating reading. It starts as a boy in Lhasa from a noble family, and then goes through his elevation to a monk of high standing, and then going to China (around the time the Japanese were invading) and then due to a lot of wounds and injuries received the necessity of moving his soul from one living body to another (which is why he is called a walk-in). Some of the details about the Japanese invasion of China are shocking (painting a horrible picture of war). There is a high level of detail when his soul and all his memories become present in the body of a plumber living in England. This person was married and was living in London throughout World War II and endured the bombings etc and later, unemployment. This soul had meetings with the Tibetan monks on the astral prior to the decision to relinquish his body living an Earth life so that a soul transfer could be made. Apparently the removal and reinstating of the soul is one of the arcane knowledge and practices of the old Tibetan lamas. It's a while since I read it but Lobsang had telepathic meetings on the astral with the soul who relinquished his body (so all was done with full consent), because that soul wished to go onwards in the astral and not live the Earth life any more.

In the Doctor From Lhasa there is a chapter called "When the World was Very Young". He describes his visit to the hidden caves and mysterious tunnels beneath the Potala (in Lhasa) and being taken there by his mentor and Master to read the ancient inscriptions. That also describes a time when megafauna and megaflora were common on Earth, since the magnetics of the planet were different due to a different rate of rotation. There was also a race of giants, who mentored mankind, and they also had space travel. The ET race were peaceful for a long time, but then created war on Earth. Then a planet came too close to Earth and apparently collided and caused mayhem and Earth changes (and reversed the spin of the Earth on its axis) and then the Sun moved across the sky from east to west, not west to east as it was before. The moon only came into being at this time as a relic of the collision.

In his early life as a Tibetan monk, he lay in an open sarcophagus and had to remove his consciousness from his body and was in that state for 3 days. I am reminded that such sarcophagi are found in Egyptian pyramids. There is also information about the invasion of Tibet by the Chinese.
 

One65

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They are the first metaphysical books I came across in my 20's. They were riveting and I enjoyed them very much. They are good books to give to someone who has an open mind but hasn't quite awakened, or maybe is just breaking free of the tunnel vision dictated by society. Lots of mind-bending information , but it comes out at a bit of a trickle.
 

June

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I was given ‘ The Doctor from Lhasa ‘ and ’ The Rampa Story ‘ many years ago, they were very tatty but I remember reading about his life, going to China and terrible time with the Japanese. How the British plumber was happy to relinquish his body so Lobsang could walk in.
I remember reading about him visiting the hidden caves and how when something big collided with Earth, think I remember it saying there was darkness for a while and when it cleared they saw that the sun was going a different way.
I think also that Tibet was flat and the giants used to like playing in that area, after the collision Tibet had risen and the high ground had flattened.

Thanks for the reminder Melt, it’s so long since I’ve read them and I can’t find them, they were falling to pieces but I wouldn’t have thrown them out.
I also purchased ‘ The Hermit ‘ and ‘ The Cave of the Ancients ‘ two or three years ago.

I was fascinated from the start with my tatty books, there didn’t seem anywhere to obtain more at that time but there is now so I’m ordering those two again.”
 

June

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I agree they are expensive for such small books, I found one ‘ The Third Eye ‘ for approx £5 on Amazon, but there would be postage on top. The other two I wanted were over £11, with supposedly free postage.
I’ll see what is on offer secondhand
 

Lila

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How about the library?
I am just now reading Space Time Transients which was recommended on another post. When I looked up prices for buying the book online they ranged from about $250-$2000 which was way too much! Thankfully, I found it at the library.
I think I'll look these up too.
 
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Alain

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So taking david topis knowlege the silicon trees and most of what seems to be in this books and you know one heck of a combined knowledge of how things changed from old to the opressif system known now
 
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Marblint

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Wow, that is taking me way back, while I was in my teen years.
I spent a lot of time at the hospital back then, and those Rampa books were always by my bed.
The funny thing is that it was my mom buying those books, and she read them too.
But she was- and still is- a deeply religious christian beleiver. I guess having new info on how the spirituality works elsewhere don’t change you...
But for me, it was all “but of course” info...
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

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I'm re-reading the Hermit (inspired by my own thread :)) ) and you realise that the time that the Hermit is referring to goes back to probably the second half of the nineteenth century. At that time he was picked up (abducted) by a space craft, and they were using the viewing technology that many abductees have described since then. In other words, you know you are not looking at a video or picture, but probably live-streaming satellite. The Hermit did not have modern words to describe this. And actually, being a simple Tibetan monk of those times, he did not have words for many of the concepts we know today. But he still managed to describe them very vividly.
 

June

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I’ve also been inspired by your thread to re-read ‘ The Cave Of The Ancients ‘ He was a small boy being taught by his guide, the Lama, Mingyar Dondup.
A lot of interesting info explaining things in a really simple way. Not trying to be clever and air his knowledge. I liked this guy from my first tatty book in the nineties.

I’ve just ordered ‘ The Rampa Story and The Third Eye ‘ second hand. I had these books but can’t find them, what the betting they come to light just as the new ones arrive. Lol
 
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June

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Thank you so much for sharing and introducing me to Lobsang Rampa. After searching on Reddit about him, I came across someone who posted free audiobooks including some of Lobsang Rampa’s books. The site checked out and thought I would share :)
Thanks for the info, Cassi, I clicked onto the site and it said ‘ this site is not private and could possibly steal personal stuff ‘ words to that effect anyway. And me being a bit of a dumbo with computers thought I best leave it to those who know what they are doing..
 
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Janne

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I agree they are expensive for such small books, I found one ‘ The Third Eye ‘ for approx £5 on Amazon, but there would be postage on top. The other two I wanted were over £11, with supposedly free postage.
I’ll see what is on offer secondhand
Where I am in NZ, I am always finding old copies at second hand book shops or book fairs very cheap , only a few NZ $ But I have the whole set and a few more besides and have had many of them since the early 70's.
I used to correspond with the Rampas for years. Lobsang Rampa changed my life when I was lost as my religious studies had taken me nowhere...

His books explained my astral travels and taught me I am a unique spiritual entity and that I planned my life before I came here, also that every soul is equal. I instinctively knew that what he taught was the most profound truth i had ever been taught in my entire life to that point.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

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I am still progressing in my re-reading of The Hermit. For people who haven't read it, the time period is either the late 1890's or very early 1900's, when the hermit is detailing his experiences to the young monk who visits his Tibetan mountain fastness (cave). But the hermit is recounting experiences he had as an abductee on an alien spacecraft, about 60-70 years earlier. He was tasked by these aliens to live carefully and preserve himself in solitude, as he would be visited by a human that they would plant on the scene at a later time (the young monk) who would then go on to relay the information he received from the hermit to the wider global audience. These aliens called themselves Gardeners of the Universes (they come from a Universe not one but two Universes away from ours), and they travel in great spacecraft called the Ark of Space. On these arks they carry plants and animals and even hominids (in our case) to seed planets. It is explained early on in the book that the Gardeners can't just send a prepped and advanced individual to spread knowledge, as that had been tried before and back-fired. So they are trying this round-about way of abducting a simple soul with an eidetic memory, but who is not influenced by power and culture, who can relate the tales of his experiences to a (what we now call today, starseed) soul who is human, born with the same amnesia as every human, but who becomes aware of his/her task in life through life experience.

The book was first published in 1971 by Corgi. I think some of the details given by the author were not known by the general public at the time of writing, but even if they were known in the 1960's they probably weren't known in the 1890's or 1820's.

Here are a couple of telling excerpts, which are stated to be per the Hermit's actual experiences:

Page 134: "On an adjacent screen the disc-shaped vessel was tearing along leaving an almost intangible trail of faint blue light behind it. The speed was so great that as the picture moved to keep the ship centred, the stars appeared as solid lines of light. The Voice murmured, "We will omit the needless travel sequences and keep to the items which matter. Look at the other screen." I did so, and witnessed the vessel, now travelling very much more slowly, circling around the sun, OUR sun. But a sun very, very different from what it is now. It was larger, brighter, and vast streamers of flame reached out far beyond its girth. The ship circled round, orbiting first one world and then another."

Page 137: "The great vessel decelerated and swung in an orbit such that it was stationary relative to one point on the Earth. Aboard the ship a small craft was made ready. Six men and women entered and again an opening appeared in the floor of the parent ship through which the survey vessel dropped. Again on the screen I watched as it fell through the thick cloud and emerged a few thousand feet above the water. Moving in a horizontal plane it soon came to where the rock land projected above the water.....
Carefully, very, very carefully, the small ship sank lower and lower....it made landfall. Here, resting upon the hard surface, the crew made what appeared to be routine tests. Satisfied, four members of the crew donned strange garments which covered them from neck to feet. Upon their head each person placed a round transparent globe which connected in some way with the neck-piece of the garment already donned.
Each picked up a case and entered the small room the door of which was carefully closed and fastened behind them. A light opposite another door glowed red. The black pointer on a circular dial commenced to move, and as it came to rest over an "O" the red light turned to green and the outer door swung open. A strange metal ladder, as though imbued with life of its own, rattled across the floor and extended down to the ground some fifteen feet below."

Page 139: "Many centuries passed on the Earth. In the time of a ship travelling through space, it was but weeks, for the two times are different in some manner difficult to comprehend, but it IS so."

I find it remarkable that the hermit describes a decompression chamber, or airlock on the shuttle vessel. Of course he doesn't know the words air lock or shuttle, so he calls the vessel a survey vessel.
 
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June

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Thank you, Melt. I’ve just finished rereading The Hermit, and was planning on sharing the type of things you have, you’ve saved me the trouble and probably done a much better job.

I had to smile at the way the Hermit described things he had no knowledge of that to us is quite common. I also felt that their treatment of him was sometimes less than loving, they didn’t seem to take into consideration that he would naturally be terrified. A bit like humans treat some of the animals they capture perhaps, we don’t think they have any feelings, maybe they thought the Hermit, being a savage, didn’t have any.
While reading I asked several times. Where is Love. the love we talk about on RT. I will be interested if you feel the same, Melt.

Yesterday I received the two I ordered, The Rampa Story and The Third Eye. Having lost my original ones, so look forward to rereading those.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

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Thank you, Melt. I’ve just finished rereading The Hermit, and was planning on sharing the type of things you have, you’ve saved me the trouble and probably done a much better job.

I had to smile at the way the Hermit described things he had no knowledge of that to us is quite common. I also felt that their treatment of him was sometimes less than loving, they didn’t seem to take into consideration that he would naturally be terrified. A bit like humans treat some of the animals they capture perhaps, we don’t think they have any feelings, maybe they thought the Hermit, being a savage, didn’t have any.
While reading I asked several times. Where is Love. the love we talk about on RT. I will be interested if you feel the same, Melt.

Yesterday I received the two I ordered, The Rampa Story and The Third Eye. Having lost my original ones, so look forward to rereading those.
Interesting that you ask about Love, June, and I only have my layman's "nose" to go with on that.... but I'll jump in and say that Tibetan Buddhism has been a patriarchal effort, in that women weren't inducted, or if they were, were kept on the outer layers of the hierarchy (as opposed to Gautama Buddha, who did have women disciples when he was alive). In fact, throughout the Lobsang Rampa books, when discussing the Tibetan part of his life growing up from a young boy as a monk studying to be a lama, he often mentions that the only women he knew were his mother and sisters, and that he was terrified of women as he didn't have enough opportunity to know what women were like.

Perhaps there is an imbalance because of this gender divide. The Tibetan lama's path to enlightenment is one of clarity, and basically clarity is LIGHT and LIGHT is LOVE, in other words, there is no difference, but the path to achievement of the understanding differs. I don't think they attend workshop sessions on how to love themselves, the better to love others, put it that way. Tibetans use mandalas such as sand paintings, and periods of fasting and contemplation, sometimes sense deprivation (the hermits in the hermitages in the mountains) all of which is to obtain purity of thought and then to achieve non-thought. So that is not the path of Love as we might think about it. They were used to hardship and a rigorous life. They had some pleasures, such as kite flying, but not many.

That is why I think the books smack of a certain reality that did exist in the days of those lamaseries, before the Chinese invasion. The way the books describe it is exactly how life was lived there. And that is why I think the rest is not fantasy. It is just further description. Lobsang Rampa (after the walk-in in his English body) always wrote in the foreword to his books that these were his exact experiences - nothing was embellished or made up.
 

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