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High Blood Pressure? Take it to the Barbershops.

Lila

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Global Moderator
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#1
How is this for simple, inexpensive and creative health interventions?

Researchers in Los Angeles created a program where a pharmacist visiting the local barbershop worked with the patrons' doctors to care for patrons with high blood pressure. When this was done, there was an average 3x bigger decrease in high blood pressure measurements compared to when they were talked to about possible lifestyle interventions and encouraged to visit their doctors.
A previous studies had taken the intervention to the barbershop and another empowered pharmacists to take the lead on high blood pressure intervention. This study put the two pieces together. It seems to work.

The reason why black LA men were targeted for this intervention was noted as follows: "As it stands, non-Hispanic black men have the highest rate of hypertension-related death of any racial, ethnic, or sex group in the U.S., they noted, adding that black men have less physician interaction than black women and lower rates of hypertension treatment and control."

The study was just 6 months long, so the next step being studied is whether the drops in blood pressure can be sustained. Churches, beauty salons and nail salons are 'trusted community venues' which are mentioned in the article as possible places where health interventions may be staged next.: https://www.medpagetoday.com/cardiology/hypertension/71704?xid=NL_breakingnews_2018-03-12&eun=g883822d0r&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=LateShift_031218&utm_term=Late Shift

... Just one more bit of research that shows how vital community is to health, in so many ways.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#2
It seems the outcome, whilst encouraging, is tied to "controlled hypertension", meaning the people in the research now take their meds. Perhaps they did not see the importance of doing so, when not involved in their own communities, but now they have buy-in because it is people they respect and know that encouraged them.

However, I would like to know how someone comes off meds and keeps their blood pressure down all the time. Any ideas?
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Global Moderator
Board Moderator
#3
However, I would like to know how someone comes off meds and keeps their blood pressure down all the time. Any ideas?
Yeah, that was my next post, probably because I believe so strongly in taking care of these issues with lifestyle intervention whenever possible (it is almost always possible, though given the unsupportive way our world is currently built, it can be very tough to do so, involving a lot of very touch and/or unpopular choices).

The post that addresses how to come off meds and keep blood pressure down (and increase mood, decrease cholesterol, increase energy, etc, etc) via a successful social mechanism is here: https://www.transients.info/roundta...ial-connection-healthy-food-weight-loss.4617/

Some may be put off by the material in the posting because it was done within a church. Some may love that.
What I love about it is that somebody made the connection between places we gather (barbershops, churches, salons, wherever) and the opportunity to make such places supportive of changes we choose; such as healthier lifestyle choices.

When you come down to it, these are the choices that I think of when we talk about "regaining our sovereignty". This is where the 'new agey' stuff gets real, puts its 'boots on the ground'.
Each time someone turns down a pesticide laden big box store 'food item' in favour of a locally grown organic fruit they do something for the environment as well as their health. Every time someone makes a decision to take their bike to work the air we share is a little cleaner and lower their risk of cancer, heart disease, strokes, etc Every time someone takes the time to visit grandma they keep some hard-gained wisdom here for us a little longer and strengthens a connection that makes us all richer, especially the person holding grandma's hand. Every time someone plants a fruit tree not only do they provide much needed blossoms for our dwindling bee population, provide a bird hangout so we can all listen to their songs but they get a bunch of fruit for themselves and to share for very cheap and the opportunity to smell those blossoms and watch them open.
It's those little choices that all add up (just like the gnomes;)). They can make big change.
I'm inclined to hug everyone who makes such choices. As that embarasses some folks and would be very time consuming, involving a lot of travel I make do with careful and discerning local hugging; lots of it:-))
 

Linda

Sweetheart of the Rodeo
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#4
Great idea because lots of people get "white coat fever" and tend to avoid doctors.

Churches often are great places for these services because there often are things going on during the day. At the one I attended, you always could get a cup of coffee and some cookies if you dropped by, as well as visit with the ladies who were quilting. It was a lot like being at your grandparents' house.
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
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Global Moderator
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#5
It was a lot like being at your grandparents' house.
Yes, it's interesting how varied the atmosphere in any given church (or barbershop or office or shop...) can be. Just like people. Infinite variety:cool:
 

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
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Creator of transients.info & The Roundtable
#6
Researchers in Los Angeles created a program where a pharmacist visiting the local barbershop worked with the patrons' doctors to care for patrons with high blood pressure. When this was done, there was an average 3x bigger decrease in high blood pressure measurements compared to when they were talked to about possible lifestyle interventions and encouraged to visit their doctors.
I'm a bit confused about the process. So a pharmacist goes to a barbershop and then talks to a customer to find out who their doctor is, and then at some point returns to talk to the customer in the barbershop about what medications they need? So the doctor doesn't talk to them directly?
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
Staff member
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#7
I believe that the pharmacist and doctor talk between themselves but the person with high blood pressure does not necessarily interact directly with the doctor initially.
 

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#8
The article is calling it an efficacy trial. Not a double-blind trial, as would be expected in a scientific medical trial. However, the trial (study) was collecting statistics: "Over 6 months, each participant assigned to the intervention averaged seven in-person pharmacists visits, four follow-up phone calls from pharmacists, and six participant-initiated contacts with pharmacists."
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
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#9
Yes, I believe they are breaking new ground, trying out a new way of doing things.
 

Anaeika

Boundless Creation
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#10
However, I would like to know how someone comes off meds and keeps their blood pressure down all the time. Any ideas?
Here is an alternative way to lower blood pressure using essential oils:

Promotes homeostasis:
Lemon essential oil and lemon peel (will regulate pressure—either raise or lower as necessary). Lime may also be used for this purpose.

Lowers blood pressure/for hypertension:

ylang ylang, marjoram, eucalyptus, lavender clove, clary sage, lemon, wintergreen

Note: Avoid rosemary, thyme, and possibly peppermint, as these are used for hypotension/low blood pressure.

Bath 1: Place 3 drops ylang ylang and 3 drops marjoram in bathwater, and bathe in the evening twice a week.

Blend 1: Combine 10 drops ylang ylang, 5 drops marjoram, and 5 drops cypress in 1 oz. fracionated coconut oil or another carrier oil. Rub over heart and reflex points on left foot and hand.

Blend 2: 8 drops lemongrass and 3 drops lavender in 1 oz. fractionated coconut oil. Rub over heart and reflex points on left foot and hand.

This information is from my reference book Modern Essentials.
 

June

Visiting Paragon
#11
Organic apple cider vinegar is good for lowering blood pressure but you would have to look into this as I think you have to be careful if diabetic.

Garlic is also beneficial al though it takes a little longer to work.
Raw garlic is recommended but personally I would take capsules, might lose all your friends otherwise

Another option is homeopathic remedies, I use these a lot for minor problems with great affect, but for lowering blood pressure in a diabetic, it would be wise to consult a Homeopath.
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Global Moderator
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#13
Thanks for the blood pressure lowering tips, Anaeika amd June:)
We can just call this an online barbershop, or salon, where people have conversations about this kind of thing<3

Anyone else have any suggestions?

Mine would start with the basics:
Get good sleep and downtime.
Manage your stress, e.g. with meditation.
Get regular exercise. (Oops, time to do my squats and keep up my aerobics).
Get lots of omega 3 fatty acids, greens and generally eat organic whole foods as much as possible.
Have a purpose in life that jazzes you.
Keep up the friendship and healthy social connections.

Over and over, these basics have been shown to make more of a difference to health, including healthy blood pressure, than anything else.
 

Stargazer

Realized Sentience
Retired Moderator
#15
Anyone else have any suggestions?
I would also highly recommend regular meditation (which I think most of us probably already do). And regular exercise, of course.

I have a bit of a high blood pressure history myself and I think I recently shared a bit of my experience in the Emergency Room (last month?). To the doctor's amazement (and while hooked up to a whole slew of monitors for an hour or two), I was able to significantly reduce my blood pressure solely through focused meditation while I was being monitored. They didn't even have to administer any medication because of it.

On my follow up visit to my physician a few days later, my blood pressure was at a relatively acceptable level (which I credit to the fact that I meditated in the exam room while waiting for her to arrive).

I did happen to notice too that all this had occurred during a period of high solar/geomagnetic energy influx. I'm fairly confident that my elevated blood pressure episode may have been brought on or at least aggravated by that. There didn't seem to be any other related stress factors around that time for me.

Just a thought...
 

Anaeika

Boundless Creation
Staff member
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#16
Stargazer , what you did is actually a type of therapy used to reduce anxiety. Actually seeing how much control you have over your body feeds the biofeedback loop. Your ability to reduce your bp this way is great!
 
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Lila

Lila

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Global Moderator
Board Moderator
#17
I would also highly recommend regular meditation (which I think most of us probably already do). And regular exercise, of course.

I have a bit of a high blood pressure history myself and I think I recently shared a bit of my experience in the Emergency Room (last month?). To the doctor's amazement (and while hooked up to a whole slew of monitors for an hour or two), I was able to significantly reduce my blood pressure solely through focused meditation while I was being monitored. They didn't even have to administer any medication because of it.

On my follow up visit to my physician a few days later, my blood pressure was at a relatively acceptable level (which I credit to the fact that I meditated in the exam room while waiting for her to arrive).

I did happen to notice too that all this had occurred during a period of high solar/geomagnetic energy influx. I'm fairly confident that my elevated blood pressure episode may have been brought on or at least aggravated by that. There didn't seem to be any other related stress factors around that time for me.

Just a thought...
I agree.
IMO, yours is a great story about how meditation can be used 'in the moment' to lower blood pressure, as well as over a period of time.
I also agree that this is something to work up to, as it may take some practice to get there. Then again, it might work right off the bat. Either way, it seems well worth being aware of it as a tool to try.
Thanks for posting that reminder here:cool:
 

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#18
I would also highly recommend regular meditation (which I think most of us probably already do). And regular exercise, of course.

I have a bit of a high blood pressure history myself and I think I recently shared a bit of my experience in the Emergency Room (last month?). To the doctor's amazement (and while hooked up to a whole slew of monitors for an hour or two), I was able to significantly reduce my blood pressure solely through focused meditation while I was being monitored. They didn't even have to administer any medication because of it.

On my follow up visit to my physician a few days later, my blood pressure was at a relatively acceptable level (which I credit to the fact that I meditated in the exam room while waiting for her to arrive).

I did happen to notice too that all this had occurred during a period of high solar/geomagnetic energy influx. I'm fairly confident that my elevated blood pressure episode may have been brought on or at least aggravated by that. There didn't seem to be any other related stress factors around that time for me.

Just a thought...
Yes, that'a beauty, and eminently sensible!
 

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