Healthy recipes; I'll share mine if you'll share yours :-) (1 Viewer)

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Lila

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Eating healthy is something I consider a cornerstone of being healthy. It occurred to me as I cooked today that we have folks here from a variety of cultures and corners of the world, so that if we each shared a recipe we considered healthy we'd probably come up with a great list.
I invite you all to share something healthy that you enjoy making or eating. My intent is to keep things simple and fun. I'll start. You'll see right away that my style of cooking involves a lot of estimating and little measuring, lol:bag:D

Lila's Stir Fry; or cooking up what's in season

3-4 tablespoons of either extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil
2-3 leeks or onions
1 packet of ground poultry

4 clove of garlic (more if they're tiny; I love garlic!)
+ fresh ginger; about the size of 2 -4 finger lengths
+ fresh tumeric; about the size of 2 -4 finger lengths... all covered in a few tablespoons of olive oil

Whatever veggies are on hand and in season. Here is a sample:
1 beet
1 small kabocha squash 1551328063035.png Cook this separately in boiling water. It's worth it. Yum.
2 carrots
1 broccoli head
2 colorful peppers (red, yellow, orange or green)
1 tomato
lots of greens!
e.g. 1 bunch of parsley
+ 6 cups of spinach or arugula
1/2 cup fish sauce (lots of yummy omega three fatty acids!)


Warm up the oil at the bottom of my favourite pan at medium heat (coconut oil tolerates a higher heat than olive oil; neither should ever burn!). This is a good time to get the rice in the rice cooker or the quinoa onto the stove. Quinoa is quicker; I boil about a cup of water and add about 1/4 cup quinoa. Stir and decrease heat to simmer. Stir again in 10 min then turn off and leave on warm stovetop with lid on so it can continue cooking.

Add onions or leeks to the oil (I find that leeks cook a bit faster) and saute until they turn golden in colour and a bit limp. Once these are sauteed I add the poultry and cook until it's no longer red. This usually involves cooking a few minutes then turning it over once or twice until it's cooked.

While that's cooking I get my spices ready. Yum! I put the garlic through my garlic press, dice my ginger + tumeric and as I do this with each I drop them into a small ceramic bowl with enough olive oil to cover them (a few tablespoons of oil). Then I put them aside until later. Sometimes I am ambitious enough to grate the ginger and tumeric on my little grater from Chinatown (shaped like a ceramic fish and with little tines that stick up to grate fibrous things like ginger). Sometimes I just slice them as thin as I have the bandwidth to and enjoy the bite in the meal. Some herbalists talked about how leaving these spices to sit in the oil while slicing the rest of the meal gives them a chance to infuse the oil so that their healthy components are present in large quantities even when it's cooked. I think that was Tierna Low Dog's tip from a recent herbalist video.

If you are adding a hard squash this is a good time to cut it in half, remove the pits + top and cook it in enough water to cover it. Let it cook until it's soft enough to slice. While that's cooking... Slice or dice the beet and carrots into the onion/leek + meat mix. I have a slicer I like which my family prefers. Dicing works well too. Once all the harder veggies are cooking, this is a good time to reassess. While they are cooking I check to see what else is available and slice up the rest so that the softer veggies are ready to add once the harder root vegetables have cooked and softened.

Slice up everything else into bite sized pieces. Once the harder veggies are softened you can add them; the kabocha squash that cooked in water, broccoli, peppers, tomato. Give these 4-5 minutes to cook then add the greens; parsley + spinach/arugula. Cook the greens just long enough that they get limp. Then add my secret ingredient; fish sauce. Fold it all in with a final stir and serve hot on top of your rice/quinoa/grain of choice.

Some easy variations on the theme:
Sometimes I use turkey or chicken breast which I slice into pieces instead of ground.
Use any squash instead of kabocha; butternut and acorn are my favorites. Buy them organic and keep the peels on for extra fiber. So much simpler too:)
If I have a large hard squash I put it in the fridge for later use. It's great roasted.
If I use a zucchini instead of squash it needs less cooking time since it's a soft vegetable.
Just about any root vegetable can be cooked with the harder veggies at the start (beet, squash, carrots).
Similarly, just about any softer veggie can be cooked with the peppers, broccoli, tomato. Use what's in season to get freshness.
Use lots and lots of greens. It's amazing how little space they take up once cooked so use more than you think. They're amazingly healthy. Use just about anything green that you like (except lettuce): kale, chard, lamb's quarters, herbs from the garden, whatever. This is where you get the most out of buying organic or picking straight from your garden as greens tend to pick up a lot of pesticides, so buy organic and avoid these nasties.
Sometimes I add a lemon or lime instead of the tomato.
I've used soy sauce instead of fish sauce (use gluten free soy sauce if you are gluten free). Fish sauce is a great way to get healthy omega three fatty acids + I love the taste.
 
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Linda

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So many wonderful ideas. We like a cooked meal for dinner, as salads often happen at lunch, so I load up on the veggies and use less meat.

I recently learned that changing the ingredients is good for our bodies and one of them is cooking oil. Avocado oil was suggested, and we like it a lot. So, some meals it is olive oils and others, avocado oil.

Thanks, Lila, great thread!
 
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Linda

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Add watercress to everything - garnish to soup, stir-fry, or casseroles - addition to salads. It has a pleasing peppery taste and has been accepted in this household. I buy it at Natural Grocers but have not seen it in the big grocery store, yet.

Why watercress? You can accomplish a lot with a little bit. Also, it adds a new taste to the "usual suspects" that are part of our dinner routine.

Watercress is very low in calories, but contains phytonutrients like isothiocyanates and antioxidants with a plethora of disease-preventive properties. Gluconasturtiin, a glucosinolate compound providing the peppery flavor, is one of them, contained in the leaves and stems and providing phenethyl isothiocyanates, shown to inhibit carcinogens.
Vitamin K is by far the most prominent nutrient in watercress, with 312% of the daily recommended value. It forms and strengthens the bones and limits neuronal damage in the brain, which is helpful in treating Alzheimer's disease. There's also vitamin C, with 72% of the daily value, closely followed by vitamin A with 64%. Vitamin C provides top-notch infection-fighting power to stave off colds and flu, help maintain healthy connective tissue, and prevent iron deficiency. Vitamin A, also known as retinol, is essential for a properly functioning immune system and produces pigments in the retina of the eye, an absence of which can cause night blindness.
https://foodfacts.mercola.com/watercress.html
 
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Lila

Lila

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I love watercress and have planted in my gardens as I've moved. Luckily, I seem to have found the right spot for it in my current garden. It doesn't like to dry out and I suspect it doesn't like too much direct sunlight.
My preference for having it in the garden is mostly because it's really fresh when I pick it. This is true for all greens but watercress in particular is sensitive and can't last long, I find. When buying it in store I had by far the best luck when it came with roots so that I could put it in a glass of water and have a bit every day.
Once you find it a good spot to grow it's really easy and spreads readily so you get lots from a small start. Yum!

I've read that the 'bite' in watercress, arugula, radishes, etc can have is a sign of some of the healthy ingredients. I think it was the isothiocyanates that are amazing for helping your liver detox all kinds of tough things in our environment... so a little watercress a day can go a long way toward health.
 
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Hailstones Melt

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We are so in sync with this one (at least last night), Lila. I had: you guessed it - minced turkey (same as ground poultry) and fresh veg stir fry.

I'm on a low budget (welfare) so I have to be frugal in the choices of foods but this is what went into mine:

(All veg sliced up fine)

1/2 white cabbage
2 brown onions
1 red capsicum (same thing as red peppers, no heat)
2 carrots
1 daikon radish (Long white Japanese radish)
Packet of fresh turkey mince
Black pepper
Dash of sunflower oil for light frying
1 pkt of dry French Onion soup
Some water

Tahini sauce liberally sprinkled over the whole, when done:

Blend all together:
Minced garlic
Good dollop of organic tahini
Few spoons of sour cream
Lemon juice for consistency

That was it. Dinner ready in 20 minutes. Normally I would serve most things with cooked rice, but I was hungry and lazy yesterday, and the dinner without the rice went down a treat.

On the note about squash: if it's the one like you have in the picture, with orange flesh, we call that pumpkin. Squash is more an elongated shape, like gourds, and also little yellow or greenish-white round ones with white flesh inside. I'm much more likely to have zucchini hanging around (but not to my daughter's taste so I only have it if she's not here). She also doesn't like pumpkin, but I love it as it is a favourite in Australian cuisine. I make it the hero of my dish, if I'm using it. And it's cheap to buy, too!

Note about the peels on the pumpkin: I must have trained my hand in being able to thinly slice away the peel, even on an uncooked hard vegetable. I don't think I like the idea of eating peel on pumpkin (although I can maybe at a stretch see the health benefits, since everything packaged by nature is there for a reason, and probably hides the best vitamins just under the peel). I don't like to parboil and then peel, as I don't like handling soggy vegetables. Nope - it's get out the small sharp knife (no peeler for me, what am I, a wimp?) cut the veg into manageable chunks and peel away leaving the fresh, glowing orange flesh ready to go for simmering, parboiling or baking.
 
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Lila

Lila

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Note about the peels on the pumpkin: I must have trained my hand in being able to thinly slice away the peel, even on an uncooked hard vegetable. I don't think I like the idea of eating peel on pumpkin (although I can maybe at a stretch see the health benefits, since everything packaged by nature is there for a reason, and probably hides the best vitamins just under the peel). I don't like to parboil and then peel, as I don't like handling soggy vegetables. Nope - it's get out the small sharp knife (no peeler for me, what am I, a wimp?) cut the veg into manageable chunks and peel away leaving the fresh, glowing orange flesh ready to go for simmering, parboiling or baking.
You're a braver and more capable cutter than I am. I tried peeling some of those squashes/pumpkins while uncooked and pretty quickly decided that I liked my fingers the way they were:eek::-))
From there I started to cook them and then do the soggy peel that you mention disliking. Once I decided that the peel was nutritious I simplified. Now I let anyone who doesn't like them peel off whatever they don't like while I indulge in the extra fiber. It'll help keep my blood sugar down too:cool:
 
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Anaeika

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I like to prepare Dr. Weil’s tuscan kale salad. The recipe is all over the internet. The lemon takes away the dirt taste that kale can have and makes the leaves tender.
 
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Lila

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The lemon takes away the dirt taste that kale can have and makes the leaves tender.
Ooh, this sounds like a great tip! Thanks:cool:
 
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Angela

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I'm currently making this again. It is wonderfully delightful.

With the apricots in season, I have been very much enjoying this recipe. With its alternative grains and tasty texture.
I put the poppyseed in the cake rather than on top.
 

Angela

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Here's another I've been liking. (I hate breakfast normally, so these options are pretty huge for me.)

I've been having this with the in season cherries and it is divine.
 
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Lila

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Here's another I've been liking. (I hate breakfast normally, so these options are pretty huge for me.)

I've been having this with the in season cherries and it is divine.
Fantastic, I just got gifted a heart molded out of dark (sugarless) chocolate straight from the source. I was wondering what I'd make with it. I think I now know:-D
I also have experimented with chia pudding and loved it. It really is touch to leave alone in the fridge once it's made, lol.


Also, I must have missed your buckweak apricot poppy seed breakfast cake when you wrote about it. Thanks for that one! I'm a big fan of buckwheat. Not everyone is as it's quite dark and I find it has a bit more texture and flavour than some flours, which is something I enjoy, though it's not to everyone's taste. I can also find it in local stores sold inexpensively.
 
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Angela

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I like buckwheat a lot. I've used it as an alternative flour and have enjoyed it every time. I even cooked it up as oatmeal and it was pretty tasty like that too, but I get weird with oatmeal (And hot cereal) textures so I tend not to.

That sounds like an amazing use of that chocolate. Sounds divine.

I've been cooking a lot lately, so I'll go through some of my recipes and share more in a bit.
I fact, there's a really good cherry quinoa fennel salad recipe I've done that I've been going crazy over too. I'm typically not even a fennel fan.
 
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Lila

Lila

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I bought a heart of fennel last week, and I don't know how to prepare it. I think I prefer to eat it cooked. Have you got any recipes for that?

View attachment 7671
I use fennel root in the base of my meals; anything from stir fry to pasta sauce to lentils + rice to ground meat. Typically I start by browning either leeks or onions in olive oil then adding tumeric (with pepper) and ginger and garlic which I've let sit in some olive oil while I prep the next thing. I let them sit so that they infuse the oil.
If I have it I'll slice up some fennel root into that.
Other things I may add into the 'root mix' that forms the base of these meals is celery root, occasionally other greens/stems/parsley if I have a lot of them around; it's a dynamic thing that looks a bit like 'let me see what I've got kicking around the kitchen'. This doesn't make for great ability to transfer recipes but it does make for some great meals.
My favourite is to make a big honking amount of base and then put some aside in the fridge for the next meal or two. Saves me time and effort.
 

Angela

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This is the salad I made with fennel that I absolutely love. It's very fresh and tasty.
I've also used it in an au gratin with potato, parsnip, and apple. Adds an extra zing to the flavor.

The fronds, I've made into a pesto (that I am loving). I make large batches of that and freeze it. It uses up a ton of it, which is great because when you get fennel with the fronds, it's a Lot of it hanging off the top. Haha
 

Angela

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I use fennel root in the base of my meals; anything from stir fry to pasta sauce to lentils + rice to ground meat. Typically I start by browning either leeks or onions in olive oil then adding tumeric (with pepper) and ginger and garlic which I've let sit in some olive oil while I prep the next thing. I let them sit so that they infuse the oil.
If I have it I'll slice up some fennel root into that.
Other things I may add into the 'root mix' that forms the base of these meals is celery root, occasionally other greens/stems/parsley if I have a lot of them around; it's a dynamic thing that looks a bit like 'let me see what I've got kicking around the kitchen'. This doesn't make for great ability to transfer recipes but it does make for some great meals.
My favourite is to make a big honking amount of base and then put some aside in the fridge for the next meal or two. Saves me time and effort.
This is great. I am a big fan of throwing whatever extra vegetables I can into meals, but I never thought to through some things like fennel or celery root in a base of a meal. I get those from the farm, but I don't cook those kinds of meals as often anymore. But I'm going to remember this. Thank you!
 
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Lila

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This is great. I am a big fan of throwing whatever extra vegetables I can into meals, but I never thought to through some things like fennel or celery root in a base of a meal. I get those from the farm, but I don't cook those kinds of meals as often anymore. But I'm going to remember this. Thank you!
Lol, you could have put those same words into my mouth with a few tweaks as I was reading your cooking ideas and thinking how great they are though I'd not ever tried them: pesto w fennel (very intrigued!), au gratin (need to try this) and salad (gotta figure this one out).
Thank you all who are sharing.

Also, because when I get a farm box it's got a lot of whatever it's got and recipes for them need to be on hand while they're fresh if one wants to take full advantage of the freshness (freezing pesto; didn't think of that one either!).

So I guess this thread is working as I'd hoped it'd be an exchange of ideas<3<3<3
Similarly RT itself is working, with so many other examples of how we can support each other whether or not we've met 'in person':-D
Who was it that showed how good we humans are at solving even the thorniest problems if we trade ideas? Whoever it was, we really are amazing when we collaborate.
 

Angela

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Lila what kind of farm box do you get? :)
I go to a CSA farm. We each get shares. I was there as a working member for three years. This year I'm a non working member but I got a bigger share to try to work through. I love fresh organic farm veggies. <3 <3
 
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Lila

Lila

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It's a local grocery store who made a seasonal contract with a local farm. Great idea. Love the stuff.
In another place I lived I was in a more formal CSA set up. Loved that too.
 
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therium

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Therium's Riced Veggie Scramble

1 cup of riced veggies like cauliflower and carrots. Get 2 different colors.
1/2 cup chopped onion
Add any other veg you like, maybe bell peppers, broccoli, etc.
Thawed Sausage, meat, 2 eggs or tofu or other protein like chickpeas
Seasoning, like Himalayan pink salt or Cajun seasoning (BAM!) or spice weasel (spice weasel is just a joke)

1. Chop onions and brown in pan with oil.
2. Add frozen riced veggies and cook.
3. Add the protein and cook.
4. If you add eggs, add them last and scramble them with all the other ingredients.
5. Add seasoning last and turn off heat and serve. Seasonings with pepper can be made more mild with more cooking.
 
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therium

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Mrs Therium's Secret Baked Beans

1/2 cup chopped onion of your favorite type, we used sweet vidalia or red onion
1-2 teaspoons or so of molasses
1 large (12-15oz or so?) can baked beans
Chopped ham, bacon, chickpeas or tofu
Himalayan pink salt to taste

1. Chop onions and cook until they are clear.
2. Add can of baked beans, molasses and protein.
3. Cook for 15 minutes over low to medium heat. Do not let it boil over.
3. BAM! You're done.

Ok I didn't indent the steps on this one for easier cut, paste and print.
 

Hailstones Melt

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Mrs Therium's Secret Baked Beans

1/2 cup chopped onion of your favorite type, we used sweet vidalia or red onion
1-2 teaspoons or so of molasses
1 large (12-15oz or so?) can baked beans
Chopped ham, bacon, chickpeas or tofu
Himalayan pink salt to taste

1. Chop onions and cook until they are clear.
2. Add can of baked beans, molasses and protein.
3. Cook for 15 minutes over low to medium heat. Do not let it boil over.
3. BAM! You're done.

Ok I didn't indent the steps on this one for easier cut, paste and print.
I like the BAM! comment.
 
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Lila

Lila

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What are riced veggies?
I think I'm hungry; those recipes sound really good; especially the baked beans!
 

Angela

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This is one I put in my cookbook a while ago. I'm making it for dinner tonight. I wrote down in my book that I "adapted" it from this. So it probably means I added corn or something. Heheh. Either way. It's a really nice vegan dish that you only mess one pan up with. (Win!) Hearty and warm.
 
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Angela

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What are riced veggies?
I think I'm hungry; those recipes sound really good; especially the baked beans!
Riced veggies is when you get them broken up into small rice sized pieces. It's smaller than mincing. Probably from a food processor. There are also ricer tools that you steam or cook veggies nice and soft, then push it through there like a garlic press.
Often cauliflower is riced and used in various ways.
 
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Lila

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Yes, I guess the idea of 'ricing' into smaller bits is similar to 'blending' them into smoothies; perhaps with some fruit juice added.
Thanks, I hadn't heard that term.
 

Angela

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I got a spiralizer and it has been great fun.
For lunch today, I made spiralized summer squash with turkey meatballs and fennel prond pesto. (The meatballs and pesto are both things that I made and froze.)
 
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Lila

Lila

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Great when you can freeze things for those busy days.
 

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