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Earthquake hits my neck of the woods

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
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#1
Today, at 1:00pm Western Standard Time (WST) a 5.6 earthquake hit south-west Western Australia, between Walpole and Kojonup (near town of Manjimup, 5,000 pop.). It was felt as 1 jolt, lasting a couple of seconds. The area is about 430kms south west of Perth populated by small, rural townships and farming regions. This is also a very popular tourist area.

This occurrence led me to check what other recent earthquakes the Great Southern and South-West of Australia have experienced in recent times. It is quite surprising (as people tend to think this corner of Earth is quite seismically stable):-

Last week: a 3.5 off the coast of Albany (relatively close to today's one) on Wednesday; a 3.4 at Walpole on the coast on Thursday.

29th May 2016 a 5.2 in Norseman region (getting to be remote - near the beginning of the highway going east over the Nullabor). There were 3 earthquakes in a 100km radius of Norseman on 28th May and 29th May and one on July 8th 2016 in that series that were above 5.0, including a further 3 aftershocks under 3.0.

24th February 2017 a 3.0 in Norseman region (3 earthquakes under 3.0 in January/February 2017 as well)

20th June 2018 a 4.7 130km east of Norseman (remote, so nobody was injured in that one).

9th August 2018 a 4.3 at a depth of 17km also in Norseman region.


WA's largest land-based earthquake occurred in 1968 - a 6.9. This hit a remote town called Meckering, which was destroyed, injuring people and leaving many homeless.

Perhaps we are heading towards a bigger "big" one.
 

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
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#2
If there is truth to the spaceship activity around the sun, I'm also wondering if they are just visiting to catch a moment in time back here on Earth, rather than having a space battle. That moment may involve some large quake activity.
It was felt as 1 jolt, lasting a couple of seconds.
Did you feel it?
 
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OP
Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#3
No, Laron, it was too far away from the city of Perth for me to feel it, but people about 200 kms from here did feel it (and it was a further 230 kms on from that).
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#4
The earthquakes are hitting quite close to the Great Southern area I visited in June (see my thread Winter Whale Nursery). Norseman, where the series of earthquakes were in recent past years, is sparsely populated, but where the current series of earthquakes are hitting there are higher populations (but not intensely populated - WA is still a wilderness area in that respect).
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#5
If there is truth to the spaceship activity around the sun, I'm also wondering if they are just visiting to catch a moment in time back here on Earth, rather than having a space battle. That moment may involve some large quake activity.

Did you feel it?
I know the general population with cognitive dissonance would think that time-travelling watchers buying a ticket for a space odyssey show is a crack-pot theory, but I really go with that one! Why not? With knowledge, time itself can be manipulated, it is not a barrier. And should something occur at a certain time-space junction, it is better to be there in person to fully understand the implications. Not only understand the implications, but take an active part in redirecting the action, which is the script for so many of our beloved sci-fi films over the last decades.
 

Carl

Boundless Creation
#6
Assuming I could travel in time one of the ideas coming to my head would be not to travel to the past to make changes -quite risky if you read about "the butterfly effect"- but to study true history and to witness the greatest events in history -who built the pyramids? why? what did Jesus really teach? did he resurrect? who killed JFK? etc., etc., etc., -even to witness "The Event" for some perhaps.
 

Laron

Healing Facilitator & Consciousness Guide
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#7
I'm signed up tot he CHANI Project Forum and keep an eye on the quake thread. Here is something from EagleWings who lives in WA.

Now where this is interesting - some old farmers told me many years ago, of a row of round stone balls that ran past Lake Muir, due south, down to the south coast.
Then, for some 40-50 years there has been a company 'mining' there - supposedly for 'rare earths', but nothng ever seemed to get shipped, and very little is known about them.. But the area had a very strange feel.
Me thinks, this may well be another of the '10Km' quakes that BF has been talking about.... If it was, then West OZ will get a few more soon....
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#8
I guess the 10km from that quote means depth of 10km. I noticed one of the other ones was 17kms. Do shallow quakes mean more widespread damage?
 

Linda

Sweetheart of the Rodeo
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#9
Do shallow quakes mean more widespread damage?
Earthquakes travel through the subsurface and lose energy along the way. So, in general, if you had 2 earthquakes of equal strength, then a shallow one would do more damage on the surface than would a deep one. Of course, the underlying structures of the earth at that point have a lot to do with it, too.
 

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