2 days in hospital and out the other side (1 Viewer)

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Hailstones Melt

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I needed to go to hospital because of a bad dose of chest infection (not flu - no fever) but a bad asthma attack that went along with it. Shortness of breath was the major reason. I want to relay my experience over some areas related to how hospital system in my state (Western Australia) is handling CV-related issues, when it's somebody like me who is "resistant".

NOTE: The intelligent thing is not to go into any hospital (as an admitted patient) if you can avoid it. Here is what happened when I couldn't:

Going into the ER (suburban hospital - not the main one for the city)
In this state there's no lockdown or actual mask mandate in place (in public) but certain professions have to wear them, like doctors and nurses.
So on entry to ER, I advised I had a cold and chest infection (no fever) and they let me sit with the public, but soon diverted me to an isolated room (simply because of coughing/ spreading an infection). I was the only one in there but anyone else would have gone in there too. Then, because of my serious case, I was taken by a masked and robed nurse to the Respiratory Ward, where obviously it is stricter (for instance, no visitors in there). Placed in a cubicle, no mask required because of my mask exemption. But they got excited when I wanted to walk down the ward to the toilet. I would have to wear a mask to do that. As I am not going to wear a mask, they emptied a private room with its own attached toilet and I stayed in there, for the night and the next day.

Mask Mandate
I got my mask exemption in Sept 2020 by simply asking my GP. I have stress-induced asthma diagnosed more than a decade ago, but have never taken any Big Pharma medicine for it, because I hardly ever get it and in fact, couldn't recognize it when it came up and hit me like a truck this last week. The reason is, I didn't know the wheezing I get with coughing is asthma.
My GP had written "conscientious objector" but also with asthma for the reason. So far, this has stood me in good stead ever since CV became a thing. At the hospital, so as long as I stayed put in my private room, door could be open, nurses and doctors could come and go (robed and masked), I did not have to wear a mask at all. The only time was, when I was transferred to another ward/a different private room, they asked me to wear a mask for 5 minutes sitting in a wheelchair, so I could go through the corridors, which I obliged.

PCR test
On the first night (after being in the Respiratory Ward for about 6 hours) a male nurse came to give me a PCR test. I said no, he could have a cheek swab. He was quite nice to me considering. He said they only ever had one patient who had refused, and they were put in CV Isolation Quarantine (14 days) instead of having the test. I thought this was reasonable, and would have accepted, although that would have meant cut off from going back to work for longer. However, the nurse then said I had accepted a partial test (cheek) so they would do that and discuss "my case" with doctors in the morning. As it turned out, this was not the invasive one, just a quick flick around the inside cheeks, not down the throat at all. The test was sent out, and it came back negative (as I knew it would). So everyone was satisfied with that. Also, with the male nurse, I discussed how Dr Kary Mullis the inventor had said it could not be used as a reliable diagnostic tool due to prevalence of false positives, especially if the lab assay was set for over 35 cycles (i.e. CDC approved setting it at 40 cycles). Nurse asked me if I was a Laboratory Technologist (????? - me?????) No, it just pays to read Laron's posts and be a little bit updated.

Isolation
I was kept in a private room but I did not feel isolateed. Food, tea and coffee was all brought in and I was treated like any other patient. But in my move to the 2nd ward, I was told I was "greencarded". When asked what that meant, no-one could just enter the room with me without being fully garbed and foot socked, and mouth masked etc. That was actually after they knew the CV test was negative. Just the protocol for that ward, and trying to keep everyone safe, I expect. I did feel genuinely sorry for the trouble the nurses had to go through on my behalf, as they would have been sweltering in those rubber robes that cannot breathe through the fabric.

VAXX coercion
In the entire experience ( 2 nights, 2 days) no-one once mentioned the words or the concept to me. The subject was never brought up. I did not have to fight (which is good, because I was fighting my own illness!)
 

Linda

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First off - so glad you are doing better. While no hospital visit is ever great, I'm impressed with the level of care and consideration that you received. Also, amazing the vax was not mentioned. Sounds like you had several caring nurses and doctors. In so many reports, we hear of just the opposite, so, I'm pleased to hear your story. Thanks for posting.
 

Lila

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So glad to hear this; your recovery, the care you received and I always so love a story where caring is a big feature which certainly sounds to have been the case for you :-D
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Collected Consciousness
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Aug 15, 2016
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So glad to hear this; your recovery, the care you received and I always so love a story where caring is a big feature which certainly sounds to have been the case for you :-D
I'm not sure exactly what you do in the medical system, but I know that all over the world, it is primarily stacked with loving, caring, knowledgeable people, some of whom are trapped in protocols that go over and above them, but on the whole, their intent is to help people heal or transition, whichever their path is, for the best outcome. One of humanity's greatest talents is buckets of empathy, and knowing and understanding that we may take one step up and fall two steps behind, but in all that effort and struggle, real progress is made in evolution.

I also know that my body is my soul vehicle, and we've made a good team, and there's still some grunt in the old girl yet. It's good to know when you've got strong genetics (as I have from one side of my family - my father's, and I think I got most of my brains from his side as well!) But, regarding my mother, I see how I mirror a lot of her life exactly, it's just that we have chosen to face our struggles in a different way to each other, thus perhaps receiving different outcomes.
 

therium

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Nurse asked me if I was a Laboratory Technologist (????? - me?????)
Their medical degree from 30 years ago does not trump the study I have from last week. I would ask them if they use the scientific method or not, or even if they know what it is. The scientific method means they consider the most recent studies in their analysis as well, and obey their Hippocratic oath (to not do harm), and err on the side of caution.

If it came down to it, I would remind them that I have enough money for a lawsuit. First a lawsuit against the hospital and their anti-science policy, second a civil suit against the person as an anti-science individual. Plus if I won the lawsuit they will be paying my lawyer fees, all of them, and I will ask for their medical license to be pulled. Two can play that game.
 

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