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Promoted Message Sticks

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
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#1
I asked a question of myself yesterday: “What didn’t the aboriginal peoples know?”, for the simple reason that they seemed to have been in tune with cosmic harmonies that we in our cluttered and noise-producing world are struggling to identify, let alone enjoy.

And that reminded me, that I own this pair of message sticks. I originally got them during my first marriage, because our little nuclear family of Mum, Dad and Child could never sit back and let the other person speak. Someone was always interrupting, or asserting their own opinion. It got to be a cacophony, and not only that, I realised that a certain person’s mind was closed, which meant that he couldn’t let anything fresh or new in. It was almost like a veil of protective clothing that he wore. Listening wasn’t real listening. And we both did this: listening in that scenario was waiting for a chance to impose yourself. Our child was picking up bad habits.

So I hit on the idea of getting the message sticks. When we sat around the table together (and it was suggested that we do so, even for a mere conversation), the person speaking would hold the message stick, and everyone else would take a mental step back, and listen.

Well, the method was supposed to work, and it didn’t, because there wasn’t enough grace, love or determination in that combination of people to let it work. However, if we had really wanted to save our marriage, I think we could have done so, trying this.

Not only aboriginal peoples in Australia, but indigenous peoples all over the world have used this idea of holding the message stick, to ensure communication in the tribe really got to the point of being meaningful.

These sticks can also be used to create rhythmic tapping, to keep a beat, as part of a percussion group.

Now people have their phones in their hands, but is that really communication?

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{Laron: article promoted to the front page. Comments appearing on the article, and replies here, are all in the same place now.}
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#3
Another use of message stick(s) was hand carrying between tribes over a larger land mass, providing a type of diplomatic immunity.


http://www.ancient-origins.net/anci...ticks-and-ancient-system-communication-001670

Throughout Australia, it is said that there are over 200 Aboriginal languages and 600 dialects, but apparently no writing system for recording the spoken word. How then were messages transmitted between different indigenous groups across the massive landmass of Australia? The solution was found in ‘message sticks’, an ancient form of communication that has been used for tens of thousands of years, and is still in use today in some parts of Australia.

Traditional message sticks were made and crafted from wood and were generally small and easy to carry (between 10 and 30 cm). They were carved or painted with symbols and decorative designs which conveyed messages and information. In addition, the symbols were meant to prove to its recipient that the messages being carried were genuine. Some were prepared hastily, while others were prepared with more time to make the markings neat and ornate. There were always marks that were distinctive to the particular group or nation sending the message and often marks identifying the relationship of the carrier to their group. This way it could be identified and authenticated by neighbouring groups and by translators when the message stick was taken long distances and passed by hand from one tribe to another.

Message sticks were regarded as objects that granted its carrier a kind of diplomatic immunity, as it guaranteed safe passage and entry into the lands of other tribes, even when entering ‘enemy territory’. When someone carrying a message stick entered another group’s country, they announced themselves with smoke signals and were then accompanied safely with the message stick to the elders so that they may speak their verbal message. The messenger would then be accompanied back to the border with a reply to pass back to their tribe.
 

Lila

Realized Sentience
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#4
For some reason this makes me think of a wizard's staff... which can, in popular culture, be used for so many things; from a walking stick to a weapon to a seat of power, etc., often facilitating communication of who a person was by sight before a word was spoken. Much was said by the condition, artwork, additions, etc of the stick that would help a person 'size up' the bearer even from a distance.

I've always loved sticks<3
 

Linda

Sweetheart of the Rodeo
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#5
I thought of them as helping the speaker hone their spoken words, or maybe help channel guidance for what needs to be said. They are gorgeous. Thanks for sharing.
 

Pucksterguy

Boundless Creation
#6
Interesting in how all are pictured in pairs.
 
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Hailstones Melt

Hailstones Melt

Realized Sentience
Staff member
Board Moderator
#7
Interesting in how all are pictured in pairs.
Some of the message sticks that are used by the travelling ambassadors are single sticks with the messages inscribed in sections. I guess the receiving tribe inscribes their own message on the same stick and returns it to the sending tribe. I only showed the double ones, because that is the type I have, and also because you can make cool beats with them on table tops, wooden boxes, etc.

Another interesting point is that these sticks were designed relatively small, to make them easy to carry - and don't forget, they didn't wear any pockets!
 

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